COLOR and Design Video By Tom Sachs

| March 22, 2012 | 0 Comments
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COLOR and Design Video By Tom Sachs (Colour)

COLOR is the comprehensive art video of the color code for Tom Sachs Studio which he discusses color and design. TOM SACHS is a sculptor, probably best known for his elaborate recreations of various Modern icons, all of them masterpieces of engineering and design of one kind or another. In an early show he made Knoll office furniture out of phone books and duct tape; later, he recreated Le Corbusier’s 1952 Unité d’Habitation using only foamcore and a glue gun. Other projects have included his versions of various Cold War masterpieces, like the Apollo 11 Lunar Excursion Module, and the bridge of the battleship USS Enterprise. And because no engineering project is more complex and pervasive than the corporate ecosystem, he’s done versions of those, too, including a McDonald’s he built using plywood, glue, assorted kitchen appliances. He’s also done Hello Kitty and her friends in materials ranging from foamcore to bronze.

We quite enjoyed watching this video about Color it was very informative, especially about the use of color, how a lot of companies have used the colours from nature.  For example yellow is an alert colour used to make things stand out, whilst Camouflage Olive Green is designed for hiding.  This video goes on to explain about some well known companies and why they have chosen those colors.

ColorWe personally love colour, we find it a fascinating subject especially when nature and everybody sees colour in many different ways.  Funny, they have forbidden the colour purple, in the design studio.  A quirky fun piece of video about colour.

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called redgreenblue, and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.

Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

The science of color is sometimes called chromaticschromatographycolorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics ofelectromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what we commonly refer to simply as light).

The Color Wheel

A color circle, based on red, yellow and blue, is traditional in the field of art. Sir Isaac Newton developed the first circular diagram of colors in 1666. Since then, scientists and artists have studied and designed numerous variations of this concept. Differences of opinion about the validity of one format over another continue to provoke debate. In reality, any color circle or color wheel which presents a logically arranged sequence of pure hues has merit.

There are also definitions (or categories) of colors based on the color wheel. We begin with a 3-part color wheel.

Primary Secondary Tertiary Colors

Primary Colors: Red, yellow and blue
In traditional color theory (used in paint and pigments), primary colors are the 3 pigment colors that can not be mixed or formed by any combination of other colors. All other colors are derived from these 3 hues.

Secondary Colors: Green, orange and purple
These are the colors formed by mixing the primary colors.

Tertiary Colors: Yellow-orange, red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green & yellow-green
These are the colors formed by mixing a primary and a secondary color. That’s why the hue is a two word name, such as blue-green, red-violet, and yellow-orange.

 

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Category: Art Videos